Jorge Ramos says he was detained in Venezuela amid Maduro interview

Univision said Monday that Ramos and his team were being "arbitrarily" held at the Miraflores Palace in Caracas but that Maduro didn't "like their questions" during a scheduled interview. "Their technical equipment was also confiscated".

"So it is Monday night", Ramos said in a video he posted to Facebook (below).

The moves came after Venezuelan security forces violently drove back opposition attempts at the weekend to bring humanitarian aid, including USA supplies, into the country against the will of Mr Maduro.

What caused Maduro to cut the interview short?

Groups like Human Rights Watch called for the release of the journalists.

"He got up after I showed him videos of young people eating out of a bin lorry..." And he just couldn't stand it. [W] hen I showed him these images, he said that the interview was over...


"It was about 17 minutes of interview".

Venezuelan Communications Minister Jorge Rodriguez told Univision that it was not true that the journalists were being detained, according to Janiot.

"They didn't give us a reason". But "in the middle of the call, they took his phone away". "They turned off the lights", he said. And after about two hours of being detained - because we couldn't leave the palace - two hours of being detained, they allowed us to leave the presidential palace. "I think we will never have that intervew - they don't want the world to see what we did", Ramost concluded.

After Juan Guaidó called for a minute's silence for the five people who lost their lives in the aid initiative, Pence told the global press and presidents from across Latin America that it was "unconscionable that Maduro blocked hundreds of tonnes of aid from getting to his impoverished people", and repeatedly denounced that the dictator "danced while trucks full of aid and medicine burned".

Ramos earlier stated Maduro "had not liked" his questions about "the lack of democracy in Venezuela, torture, political prisoners, and the humanitarian crisis".


Popular

CONNECT