UK PM May: Failure to Back Her Brexit Plan Would Be ‘Catastrophic’

The amendment was passed by Parliament on Wednesday and now means that the Government must come back with a Plan B for Brexit three days after the vote on Tuesday.

"The country does have a right to know what members of parliament are for, not just what they are against, and it's important that the house comes to a view as to what it can back", Barclay said.

Mrs May has warned of a "catastrophic" breach of trust if Brexit is thwarted.

Labour is also facing calls to put forward a vote of no confidence in Mrs May and a general election could take place should the Government lose.

The risk of the British parliament seeking to frustrate Brexit has increased, Brexit minister Stephen Barclay said on Sunday.

Speaking on the BBC's "Andrew Marr Show" on Sunday, Corbyn said a confidence vote would be brought "at a time of our choosing, but it is going to be soon, don't worry about that".

MPs are due to vote on May's deal on Tuesday.

Downing Street said it was "extremely concerned" about the plans, reported in the Sunday Times, which could threaten Brexit legislation and the Government's ability to govern.

A no-deal Brexit would be "catastrophic" for industry and trade, Corbyn told the BBC.


Sir Vince said this could happen by cancelling Article 50 - which he noted would be "resented by lots of people" - or via a second referendum.

He also appeared to out at Labour over the continued confusion about what stance it would take on Brexit if it secured a snap general election.

- The Prime Minister faced calls from a predecessor, Sir John Major, to revoke Article 50 to halt Brexit - as he warned it would be "morally reprehensible" to crash out without a deal.

"We have a mechanism which will give parliament control of the Brexit negotiations and ensure we do not leave the European Union without a deal on March 29", he said.

More than 100 MEPs from 26 European Union member states have also signed a letter calling on the United Kingdom to "reconsider" the Brexit decision, saying the its departure will "weaken all of us".

But he has insisted the United Kingdom should not afraid of a no-deal Brexit, despite forecasts from the Treasury and Bank of England warning that it could trigger an economic crisis worse than the 2008 financial crash.

Former minister Jim Fitzpatrick told the Commons on Friday that he was "not far away" from backing May's deal, saying the "danger of no deal is still there" and the PM's plan was "the only real alternative on the table".

"I think it's now looking much less likely that parliament would allow a no-deal outcome anyway", said Mr Hunt.

Fitzpatrick, whose London constituency strongly backed remain, said "time is running out" and a so-called "people's vote" on the deal was "code for reversing original decision".


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