Huawei arrest and US-China trade truce, Larry Kudlow weighs in

If extradited to the US, Meng would face charges of conspiracy to defraud numerous financial institutions, a Canadian court heard on Friday.

Two state-run media outlets in China have come out with blistering attacks on the U.S. related to the arrest in recent days of Huawei's CFO Meng Wanzhou, who faces extradition here, saying the arrest is just a backdoor way for the USA to try to hobble the company.

On Friday, a Canadian court heard the extradition plea, but no decision was reached after almost six hours of arguments and counter-arguments.

David Martin, the attorney representing Meng at the hearing, acknowledged Skycom had been a Huawei subsidiary but said it was sold in 2009. Washington alleges that she covered up Huawei's links to a firm that tried to sell equipment to Iran despite sanctions.

The prosecutor opposed bail, arguing that Meng was a high flight risk with few ties to Vancouver and that her family's wealth would mean than even a multi-million-dollar surety would not weigh heavily should she breach conditions.

McCallum was clear that Chinese consular officials will have access to Meng "just as we seek consular access for detained Canadians around the world, including in China".

Ms Meng's arrest while she was changing planes in Vancouver last Saturday was a serious breach of her rights, Reuters quoted the foreign ministry as saying.

"You can trust her", he said.

Yesterday's court hearing is meant to decide on whether Meng can post bail or if she is a flight risk and should be kept in detention. He alleged Huawei used a Hong Kong-based company called Skycom Tech to do business in Iran for Iranian telecom companies, breaching US and European sanctions, and that Meng led USA financial institutions to believe it had no ties to Skycom when, in fact, the company was a thinly disguised subsidiary.


The executive is the daughter of Huawei's founder.

The 46-year-old executive was arrested in Vancouver while changing planes, ratcheting up tensions between the USA and China just as the countries' leaders agreed to a truce in their trade war.

Meng Wanzhou, 46, joined Huawei as early as 1993, when she began a career at her father's company as a receptionist.

"The Chinese government should seriously mull over the United States tendency to abuse legal procedures to suppress China's high-tech enterprises", said the nationalist tabloid Global Times in an editorial.

The re-imposed sanctions hit oil exports, shipping and banks - all core parts of Iran's economy.

US National Security Adviser John Bolton said his country has had "enormous concerns for years" about the practice of Chinese firms "to use stolen American intellectual property, to engage in forced technology transfers, and to be used as arms of the Chinese government's objectives in terms of information technology in particular".

"If I was an American tech executive, I wouldn't travel to China this week", warned Lewis, who labeled Huawei "one of the Chinese government's pet companies" and charged the communist country's leaders wouldn't be afraid to "take hostages".

Meng entered the courtroom in downtown Vancouver at 10:25 a.m. local time, wearing a green sweatsuit and accompanied by her lawyer.

The United States has 60 days to make a formal extradition request, which a Canadian judge will weigh to determine whether the case against Meng is strong enough.


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