Dozens of immigrant children will be reunited with parents

One child whose parents' location is unknown may not actually be an immigrant, according to the filing.

For the more than 50 children who the government says will be reunited tomorrow, what are you expecting that moment to be like for those kids and those parents?

Attorneys for the government and the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed the original lawsuit challenging family separations, said they worked together intensely over the weekend to identify the families affected by the deadline and to work out how to move forward.

This sort of carelessness raises major questions ahead of an even more significant deadline than Tuesday's: Sabraw had also ordered the government to reunite all of the almost 3,000 children it took from parents by July 26.

Rodriguez said the commander running the shelter at Tornillo told him that none of the children there would be housed at Fort Bliss, one of two Texas military bases that the Pentagon has said will likely house thousands of immigrants who have been apprehended at the border.

The Justice Department also said that only 75 of the 102 children aged four and younger who were supposed to be returned to their parents by Tuesday are eligible for reunification.

Sabraw said Tuesday that "full background checks of other adults in the household are not necessary under these unique circumstances".

In separating families, Trump sought to advance a hard-line immigration policy that past administrations had considered and quickly abandoned as inhumane.


The judge ordered the attorneys to file more thoughts by Monday evening on the timelines and procedures for reuniting those parents who will not rejoin their children Tuesday, and the court will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to discuss the issue further.

"They're working nights and weekends to comply with the judge's orders".

For almost one month Perez knew nothing about her children - "the longest, most torturous time of my life", she said.

"There's no question that the parties are meeting and conferring", District Judge Dana Sabraw said.

At a court hearing, Justice Department lawyer Sarah Fabian acknowledged the government wouldn't meet the deadline for all the children, citing a variety of reasons, including that the parents of some of the youngsters have already been deported. While parents were criminally prosecuted, children were placed in custody of the Health and Human Services Department.

Five have parents still in ICE custody who could be released soon, but require more follow-up after a background check.

The other problem is the government is using a very lengthy, cumbersome reunification process that was designed for children who were genuinely unaccompanied and are being given to someone coming forward to claim them, rather than this situation where the child was forcibly taken from the parent.

Sabraw, an appointee of Republican President George W Bush, said on Monday (Tuesday NZT) that he was "very encouraged" by the efforts to reunite families by his deadline, calling it "real progress". Fabian said, arguing their hands are tied by logistics. One area of disagreement is DNA testing on parents and children, with the government saying it should be the general rule and the ACLU saying it should be done only when no other evidence is available to prove parentage.


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