Worried about companies spying on your browsing? Here's what you can do

Last week, the Senate voted to overturn FCC rules that would protect the privacy of your web browsing history, and the House will soon be voting on the same measure. Res. 34, a resolution invoking the Congressional Review Act in order to invalidate the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules and prevent the FCC from issuing similar regulations in the future.

If the bill is approved by the U.S. House, it would be sent to President Donald Trump for his signature.

Sen. Chuck Schumer on Sunday raised the alarm on legislation making its way through Congress that would kill privacy protections on the Internet.

The ISP filing argues that information such as Social Security numbers, financial information, health information, and geolocation is "sensitive", and makes the case that information that falls outside these categories, such as web browsing history, should not be deemed "sensitive".

ISPs are required to take "reasonable measures" to keep consumer data secure.

Of course the ISPs were still free and clear to use this information for their own marketing/targeting, they were not allowed to sell it without permission. Most ISP and software users fail to read the fine print in privacy consent forms that may be hundreds of pages long and filled with legal gobbledy gook. Sometimes they claim to cloak your traffic but their privacy policies allow them to track and sell your information to advertisers. Bulk aggregate information, like how much data you used, were classified as non-sensitive and could be managed via opt-out. It could also have implications for future Internet regulations-the enforcement of net neutrality principles, for instance-that could be rolled back in the future. There will be no "opting in" for consumers, as everyone will be monitored around the clock.


Republicans claim the FCC's rules confuse customers because they only cover Internet providers and not companies like Google and Facebook.

Former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who left in January, promoted the rules which passed in October on a party-line vote.

The House is slated to hear the resolution Monday at 5 p.m. EST, but is expected to follow in the Senate's footsteps.

"It is extremely disappointing that the Senate voted today to sacrifice the privacy rights of Americans in the interest of protecting the profits of major internet companies, including Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon", ACLU Legislative Counsel Neema Singh Guliani said.

The new rules - dubbed the Broadband Consumer Privacy Proposal - would require broadband providers to get permission from subscribers before collecting and selling this data. It's not hard to see why ISPs oppose privacy regulations, especially in the wake of online entities such as Google and Facebook. While those rules have not been implemented as of yet, they require that internet service suppliers (ISPs) tell consumers what information of theirs is being collected and how it is being shared.

According to the services providing companies, getting permission from the consumer to use their browsing data would hamper their ad business.


Popular
  • Saudis announce new tax code for Aramco amid plans for IPO

    Saudis announce new tax code for Aramco amid plans for IPO

    By drastically reducing the tax rate, more cash will go to the potential owners of the Saudi Aramco compared to the government. The company's oil production is Saudi Arabia's main source of revenue and its finances are not publicly disclosed.
    National Football League  free agency: Mark Sanchez will sign with Bears, report says

    National Football League free agency: Mark Sanchez will sign with Bears, report says

    Original: With his future with the Cowboys uncertain, free agent quarterback Mark Sanchez is testing the waters elsewhere. As for the Bears, they are coming off an abysmal 3-13 season and haven't been to the playoffs since the 2010 campaign.
    Saudi Arabia Wants Trump to Drop 9/11 Terror Victims Law

    Saudi Arabia Wants Trump to Drop 9/11 Terror Victims Law

    But Congress unanimously passed the "Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act" last fall, which permits such lawsuits to proceed. The law allows the families of the victims of the 9/11 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia and seek compensation from its government.
  • Should Devin Nunes Recuse Himself From Trump Russia Ties Investigation?

    Should Devin Nunes Recuse Himself From Trump Russia Ties Investigation?

    Welch surrendered to police when he found no evidence that children were being harbored there, D.C. police said at the time. And he is so anxious by things he discovered at the White House , he had no choice but to tell ... the White House.
    Police investigating Bellagio casino burglary in Las Vegas

    Police investigating Bellagio casino burglary in Las Vegas

    According to The Las Vegas Review-Journal, three men walked into the Bellagio dressed in "dark, nice suits" and animals masks. When it wouldn't start, they tried to carjack someone else's auto , and then tried to run away, the Las Vegas Sun reported .
    Unemployment rates drop in Nebraska and Lincoln

    Unemployment rates drop in Nebraska and Lincoln

    George Zeller of Cleveland, an economic research analyst, said Ohio's job growth in February had to be put into perspective. Minnesota meanwhile recorded a seventh consecutive month of a four percent seasonally adjusted unemployment rate.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions Announces Coming Crackdown on Sanctuary City Funding

    Nationwide, $4.1 billion was awarded by the Justice Department in grants for local policing, Sessions said. Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers remarks during the daily White House press briefing on Monday.

    Vladimir Putin denies French election interference after Marine Le Pen meeting

    Le Pen said in Moscow that financial aid to her party had "in no way" been discussed during her meeting with Putin. The party yesterday dismissed the possibility of seeking further funding from a Russian bank. [nL5N1GT6JO] " Mr.
    Stan Wawrinka gets emotional, calls Roger Federer an 'a******'

    Stan Wawrinka gets emotional, calls Roger Federer an 'a******'

    Federer, the ninth seed in this event, improved his head-to-head record against Wawrinka to 20-3, including 15-0 on hard courts. Federer said. "Because this was not part of the plan, to win Australia and Indian Wells, I can tell you that". "He's laughing.
  • Bears player calls Hernandez 'my guy' at double-murder trial

    Bears player calls Hernandez 'my guy' at double-murder trial

    Prosecutor Mark Lee noted that Crawford could recall various details of the night during his grand jury testimony. Prosecutors say Hernandez shot Bradley because, as a witness to the Boston shooting, he knew too much.
    'Marine Le Pen could WIN French election', Goldman Sachs tells investors

    'Marine Le Pen could WIN French election', Goldman Sachs tells investors

    The two met in the Kremlin on Friday and "were on the same wavelength", according to one of Ms Le Pen's aides, Ludovic de Danne. She has also noted that if she is elected as president, mosques and places of Islamic teaching will be closed down.
    Strong-to-severe storms likely today

    Strong-to-severe storms likely today

    Part of North Texas was placed under a tornado watch late Sunday, but the severe weather stayed east of Wichita Falls. The strongest storms will be possible along and northwest of a line from Demopolis to Alabaster to Gadsden.

CONNECT